I often hear from direct mail users that they want to understand how to best integrate Google Pay Per Click marketing (PPC) with their direct mail. This is the last article in a three-part series where I break it down for you and show you how to do just that!

· Part I: A quick overview of what AdWords is and how it works
· Part II: How to create ads and target your audience
· Part III: How to integrate your PPC with direct mail in a way that WORKS

Ready? Let's go!

Integrating PPC and Direct Mail

The first two articles in this series hopefully helped clarify what PPC is and how you can use it to generate leads online. Now it's time to look at what this new technology can do for your direct mail campaigns. Because, yes, they totally do work together! Here's how to make sure they are on the same page for optimal results:

1. Use Direct Mail to Boost Traffic Everywhere
Pay Per Click is a fantastic way to attract the attention of prospects already looking for your products/services. But what about those that need you, but aren't looking yet? That's where direct mail comes in.

Direct mail prospects don't have to be searching for your services, because you are coming to them. Maybe they are not at all interested. Maybe they are piping hot and ready to call right away. Maybe they just want a little more information. There is a wide spectrum of possible responses. On your direct mail provide multiple response options (i.e. call, go to website, email, etc.) so the prospect can self-select the option that is right for them.

This means your direct mail campaign will increase traffic across the board. Not only will it generate sales, it will also generate website visits and form submissions on your landing pages. Already your print and digital campaigns are working together.

2. Use Pay Per Click to Grab Hot Online Prospects
If you don't know about PPC, read the first and second articles in this series (links above). While direct mail is building community name recognition and turning non-searching prospects into hot leads, PPC is building online name recognition and turning searching prospects into leads!

3. Use Google Follow-Up Ads to Turn Web Leads into Sales
Google follow-up ads are different from PPC ads. They show up on other websites, encouraging prospects to come BACK to your site and complete the sale (or fill out a form). Here's how it works:

1. Google tracks all the visitors to your website
2. Google notes which of those visitors did NOT complete the step you desired them to take (i.e. make a purchase, fill out your form, etc.)
3. Google shows targeted follow-up ads (banner ads that match your direct mail postcard design/branding) to those prospects until they return and take the desired action

You get repeated exposure to prospects until they return to your site and become customers. Google does it all for you (after setup) - and you don't pay a cent until someone actually clicks on an ad!

NOTE: There is a new direct mail product called DirectMail2.0 that actually integrates steps 1 & 3 for you. DirectMail2.0 is only available from select direct mail houses.

By implementing each of these three steps, you will harness the power of integrated marketing for your business. Direct mail generates phone and web leads, PPC generates web leads traffic, Google follow-up turns traffic into leads, and together they turn your marketing budget into an investment you're excited to make every month!

If you have any questions at all about the steps above, shoot me a question in the comments. I'll do my best to clarify it for you! Good luck!

Joy Gendusa is the Founder and CEO of PostcardMania, a fully-integrated marketing firm specializing in direct mail. She used postcards to grow PostcardMania from just a phone and computer to a $22million enterprise in less than a decade. Connect with Joy on Google+.

Download this free report to learn more about 8 online marketing products that you can offer as a compliment to your traditional direct mail and printing services:
http://www.postcardmania.com/go/8-ways-to-increase-revenue-in-a-declining-or-stagnant-print-business

Follow